Stuart Roy
Naval Architect & Consultant

Fellow of the Royal Institution of Naval Architects
Chartered Engineer

Email:  info@StuartRoy.co.uk
Tel.  44 (0) 1489-583346         Email:  info@StuartRoy.co.uk  
© Stuart Roy 2015    
Historic Ships & Boats
Extending their working life
Calypso 2007
It has been a privilege to work on a number of historic ships and boats, providing design drawings, technical support and stability consultancy, usually with the aim of keeping the vessel in service. Typically design work is necessary if the general arrangement is to be altered to suit a new role, or if a major item (keel, engine, etc) is changed.  Other projects have involved work to assess the stability, strength and performance of the vessel in its new role to ensure that it will meet the regulations.

The Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter “Alpha” (1) built in 1904 underwent major restoration work in the 1990s which included raising her specification to meet the MCA requirements for charter with up to 8 persons on board. As part of this “Coding” process the hull lines were taken off, the stability assessed against the regulations and a Stability Booklet prepared and submitted.

It was originally intended to design a new superstructure for the Admiralty Pinnace “Wheelhouse” (2) built in 1921 so that it could continue as a houseboat on the River Thames. Unfortunately the teak hull proved to be in poor condition and the vessel had to be retired to non-tidal waters. A larger replacement steel houseboat was then designed which retains a hint of the original vessel’s wheelhouse, but with the main accommodation now looking out from the aft end to enjoy the river views. See No.6 on Unique Designs & Conversions.

The exquisite 22 sq.m yacht “Vigilant” of 1930 is one of the most famous designs by the legendary Uffa Fox of Cowes. The yacht is particularly well known for being sailed to Sweden for a regatta with 3 on board including Uffa himself. The original yacht was fully restored a few years ago. A replica is currently being built in the UK to a revised construction plan (3) using laminated frames instead of closely-spaced steamed oak ribs which are troublesome to produce & prone to breakage in service.
    
The yacht “Lady Anne” (4 & 5) by the well-regarded designer N E Dallimore was built in 1935.  Currently she is being rebuilt on the east coast to the very finest standard. Originally fitted with a fat stub keel with a bronze drop-plate the rebuilt yacht will retain her shallow draught for East Coast sailing but with a traditional long keel so that no centreboard case is needed inside.
      
The 1941-built patrol boat RML497 is one of the Fairmile ‘B’ class. Now named “The Fairmile” (6) she saw active service in WW2 as an armed anti-submarine vessel. Between 1947 and 2009 she was in passenger service in Torbay as “Western Lady III”. Acquired by the Greenway Ferry company she was renovated and improved in 2009 and 2013 and now has a stunning new lower saloon decorated with prints of the original drawings which were acquired from the Maritime Museum at Greenwich.  The refit work involved a thorough stability assessment for passenger duties and the production of a Stability Booklet.

The magnificent 3-masted barque “Kaskelot” (7) was built from oak in Denmark in 1948.  In 2013 she underwent an extensive 6-month refit at Nielsen’s of Gloucester. As well as a complete renovation of the hull & rig, she was given a new engine, generators, systems and accommodation, then re-ballasted and fitted out for further work in films and marketing.  During the refit, much detailed work was done to ensure she met the appropriate regulations, including a stability assessment and Stability Booklet.   
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